Forgive me, but I’m suspicious

I have never subscribed to the conspiracy theory when it comes to complementary and alternative medicine practice however the latest proposal from the TGA may yet be another nail in the coffin. The TGA has put forward a proposal to treat Naturopaths, Herbalists and Homeopaths as “general public” with the aim to regulate information produced for these healthcare professionals in order to “manage public health risks” (Remember Naturopathy and allied practices were once banned in the US and previous attempts to ban naturopaths in Australia was thwarted by my father Maurice Blackmore and his colleagues in Queensland in 1955).

Are we returning to the dim, dark ages of the past you may well ask?

Is there a link between the efforts of the so called ‘Friends of Science’ and the decision by Sydney’s Macquarie University to no longer teach Chiropractic, or for Southern Cross University to no longer teach a basic Naturopathic course, or the attempts by the Friends of Science to curtail NHMRC funding for complementary & alternative medicine? (or ‘pseudo-science’ as they call it!).

If you wanted to orchestrate a campaign to eliminate a profession, you would first eliminate their university education, you would make sure there was no research for the profession and then simply make it illegal for them to access their ‘tools of trade’… Too provocative, maybe not?

Maybe this is just a ‘proposal’ from the TGA but why contemplate such a draconian proposal for this profession when there is little or no data to show harm being done, quite the contrary.

The reality is that one in three of all medical consultations in Australia today is with an alternative health professional. I don’t wish to be alarmist but I dearly hope that common sense will prevail.

1 Comment

Filed under Business, Natural Healthcare Industry, Uncategorized

One response to “Forgive me, but I’m suspicious

  1. I also do not subscribe to conspiracy theories but I agree, sometimes you do wonder. In making the decisions to delete these courses and potentially minimise access of the general public to practitioners who help people, who ultimately benefits? Not the public. If we want evidence that these pseudo-sciences work, just talk the the recipients and their experience and there is plenty of evidence here. Either these educational institutions think that as a population we are completely unable and inept to research and make our own decisions around the type of therapy we choose to heal ourselves, or there is actually another agenda. I would love to be a fly on the wall in those meetings.

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